Echinacea Types

Types And Varieties Of Echinacea: Classification And Difference

Three types of Echinacea are frequently grown in gardens and used for medicinal purpose: Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea purpurea, and Echinacea pallida. Each year, new varieties of purple coneflower are introduced. Currently, there are 24 varieties of Echinacea which are hybrids of two different coneflower species, namely:

  1. Avalanche (Echinacea Purpurea ‘avalanche’)
  2. Cheyenne Spirit (Echinacea ‘Cheyenne Spirit’)
  3. Daydream (Echinacea ‘daydream’)
  4. Double Scoop Cranberry (Echinacea x Purpurea ‘Balscanery’)
  5. Firebird (Echinacea ‘Firebird’)
  6. Flame Thrower (Echinacea ‘flame Thrower’)
  7. Greenline (Echinacea Purpurea ‘greenline’)
  8. Hot Papaya (Echinacea ‘hot Papaya’)
  9. Leilani (Echinacea ‘leilani’)
  10. PowWow Wild Berry (Echinacea Purpurea ‘pas702917’)
  11. Secret Passion (Echinacea ‘secret Passion’)
  12. Tomato Soup (Echinacea ‘tomato Soup’) 
  13. Intense Orange (Echinacea Kismet® ‘intense Orange’)
  14. Big Sky Sunrise (Echinacea ‘sunrise’)
  15. Green Envy (Echinacea Purpurea ‘green Envy’)
  16. Razzmatazz
  17. Double Decker (Echinacea Purpurea ‘doubledecker’)
  18. Kim’s Knee High (Echinacea Purpurea ‘Kim’s Knee High’)
  19. Bravado (Echinacea Purpurea ‘bravado’)
  20. Fragrant Angel (Echinacea Purpurea ‘fragrant Angel’)
  21. Big Sky Harvest Moon (Echinacea Big Sky ‘Harvest Moon’)
  22. Mango Meadowbrite ( Echinacea ‘Mango Meadowbrite™’)
  23. Orange Meadowbrite (Echinacea ‘Orange Meadowbrite’)
  24. Pixie Meadowbrite (Echinacea ‘Meadowbrite’)

Within the family Asteraceae (Compositae), Echinacea is one of the coneflower genera, including Rudbeckia, Ratibida, and Dracopsis. Its large flower heads are composed of many tiny flowers arranged in two distinct groups. Ray florets (flowers around the outside of the head) are sterile and have a long, strap-like corolla that can be pink to purple or yellow in rare cases. The tube florets have symmetrical, dark-colored corollas arranged around a cone-shaped receptacle inside the head. At the base of each tube, florets have a long, stiff, sharply-pointed bract.

The grasslands of eastern North America are abundant with Echinacea species. The leaves on their basal rosette, underground stems, and deep taproots leave them well suited for competing with grasses. Moreover, these traits also serve as adaptations to the stresses of grassland life, even more so during the summer months when grazing, fire, and lack of water are present.

The medicinal value of Echinacea drives its popularity and supplements come in many types and varieties. The Native American herb is cross-bred using two different coneflower species and is one of the most popular herbs in the United States. The conical seed heads of this plant have prickly scales like hedgehog spines. Best known as an over-the-counter herbal remedy, Echinacea is also called the purple coneflower and has a fiery, pungent taste. The earliest archeological evidence of Echinacea dates from the 18th century; however, we know that North American indigenous tribes used it medicinally for some time.  

According to traditional healers, the plant is used in external applications for burns, insect bites, and wounds. In internal applications, the roots are used for throat infections, pain relief, coughs, stomach cramps, toothaches, and snakebites. Echinacea is generally safe; however, it can cause minor side effects, including nausea, dizziness, and an upset stomach. Allergic reactions such as swelling, rashes, and difficulty breathing are serious side effects. Echinacea can also worsen asthma symptoms and respiratory allergies. 

What Are The Types Of Echinacea?

There are three types of Echinacea species used in herbal medicine to reduce the chance of catching a cold and stimulate the immune system. All Echinacea preparations use dried leaves, flowers, and roots. You can buy herbs from a reputable vendor and add them to your teas or tinctures in preparation for winter ailments.

1. Echinacea Angustifolia

Echinacea angustifolia is commonly known as narrow-leaf purple coneflower. Historically, it was the most widely used medicinal herb among Native Americans of the Great Plains. It is distantly related to Echinacea pallida, thriving in eastern North America. Only one instance of Echinacea angustifolia has been observed in Missouri. It occurred in Shelby County in its northeastern extremity (Steyermark). Echinacea purpurea, the only member of its genus to reach Canada, has the most northerly range among the Echinacea species.

Echinacea angustifolia has stems that reaches up to 76 inches tall and are densely covered in coarse, thick hairs. The stems occasionally branch and the leaves are lance-shaped and oblong. The entire unserrated leaf margins are dark green, with veins slightly more rounded than parallel. Echinacea angustifolia has a deep taproot, adapting well to dry conditions.

The flowers appear in June and July and occasionally bloom throughout the summer. The seeds that accumulate in the cones’ centers are attractive to Goldfinches. The name angustifolia implies the herb has narrow leaves. Aside from its therapeutic qualities, Echinacea angustifolia are natives of plant gardens, naturalized areas, prairies, and wildflower meadows.

2. Echinacea Pallida

Echinacea pallida is a rough and hairy perennial prairie herb called pale purple coneflower. It is typically found in meadows, savannahs, and the dry, rocky woods of Nebraska, Michigan, Georgia, and Texas. Its narrow leaves (4-10 inches long) are parallel-veined and toothless, and its pale pinkish-purple flowers resemble daisies. Echinacea pallida’s coppery-orange cones are spiny and knob-like, and the flowers grow on stems about 2-3 inches tall throughout the summer. 

This species is characterized by thin, extremely-reflexed rays that almost dangle straight down and narrow, parallel-veined leaves with no teeth. The flowers appear throughout the summer from late June to late July, with occasionally continued bloom in the fall. Echinacea pallida’s beautiful drooping pink and purple flower petals hang straight down, making it one of the most lovely prairie perennials. Aside from its therapeutic qualities, Echinacea pallida are natives of naturalized areas, prairies, wildflower meadows, and part-shaded areas of woodland gardens.

3. Echinacea Purpurea

An herbaceous perennial native to meadows, moist prairies, and the open woods of central and southeastern United States, Echinacea purpurea is a coarse, hairy herbaceous perennial. It is the most widely cultivated medicinal plant among the three species. This plant has been primarily used in chemotherapy for infectious diseases in the upper and lower respiratory systems.

Echinacea purpurea usually grows to be 2-4 inches tall. The showy purple coneflowers bloom throughout the summer, giving the plant its name, which means purple. The best feature for differentiating this species is the lowermost leaves which are oval to broadly lance-shaped and coarsely toothed with irregular teeth. The second-best distinguishing characteristic is found in the tips of the center cone, which are usually bright orange. Ray flowers vary from rose to deep purple, and the receptacle spines have flexible straight tips. Goldfinches or other birds that eat the seeds are visitors of the blackened cones. Echinacea purpurea is a perfect, long-blooming flower for bordering meadows, native plant gardens, naturalized areas, wildflower gardens, or partly shaded woodland gardens. It is often crowded with black-eyed Susans (rudbeckias).

 

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What Should You Know About These Types Of Echinacea?

Many alternative medicine products based on Echinacea species claim to alleviate conditions as diverse as the common cold and cancer. Echinacea is commonly used as a dietary supplement to treat infections like the common cold. It stimulates the immune system and helps the body fight disease more effectively. Some people take it when they want to prevent getting an infection. According to a systematic review by Melchart, D. et al. in Phytomedicine, preparations containing extracts of Echinacea can be efficacious immunomodulators. As an immunomodulator, it induces phagocytosis, activates fibroblast, and improvest of leukocyte mobility resulting from cellular respiratory stimulation. 

Echinacea helps lower blood sugar levels by increasing insulin levels and preventing oxidation and inflammation in affected cells and tissues. According to a study conducted by Dr. Shiow-Ying Chiou in the Journal of Medicine Food, an Echinacea purpurea extract and CAD (caffeic acid derivatives) may be helpful in controlling hyperglycemia and hypertension.

Another potential immunosuppressant compound extracted in Echinacea purpurea is called cynarin. An analysis conducted by Dong, G. et al. published in Pharmaceutical Research, cynarin blocked 87% of the CD28-dependent “signal 2” pathway of T-cell activation. This test indicates that cynarin has great immunosuppressive potential. The results show that Echinacea could be an important tool in autoimmune disorders. 

Which Type Of Echinacea Is Best For Medicinal Use?

David Winston, RH (AHG), a registered herbalist and founding member of the American Herbalists Guild, suggests that Echinacea angustifolia is the best type of Echinacea for medicinal use. Meanwhile, Kelly Kindscher, a senior scientist from Kansas Biological survey has stated that Echinacea angustifolia  was used extensively by Native American tribes for a number of ailments and as a cure-all. The healthful effects of this type of Echinacea is supported by the recently conducted extensive studies on its chemistry. For more than 120 years, Echinacea angustifolia has been harvested for its medicinal properties. 

What Supplements Include Echinacea Angustifolia?

Some nutraceutical companies produce dietary supplements that contain Echinacea angustifolia in their ingredients like Herbalist & Alchemist, Nature’s Way, Gaia Herbs, and Solaray. They are used equally for different ailments, such as reducing the risk of repeated colds, flu, ear pain, and infectious diseases.

What Are The Unique Characteristics Of Each Type Of Echinacea?

Echinacea is a genus of nine species, but three are commonly used as herbal remedies. These plants contain several chemicals thought to be helpful as immune stimulants, such as echinacoside, caffeic acid, alkylamides, and polysaccharides. Below are the unique characteristics of each type of Echinacea used in the herbal pharmaceutical industry.

Echinacea angustifolia is the narrow-leaf purple coneflower or prairie coneflower. It is nicknamed ‘Kansas snakeroot’ and is a popular plant in gardens as it attracts butterflies, bees, and birds. It may be confused with other types of Echinacea, but the appearance of its bloom is similar to a drooping purple daisy. However, it can be aggressive and quickly spread throughout the surrounding environment if not properly contained. Its yellow pollen distinguishes it from Echinacea pallida’s white pollen.

Echinacea purpurea is also known as purple coneflower or common purple coneflower. It is native to North America, making it the hardiest among the three. This variety can grow up to 4 feet tall and has tiny-appressed hairs on its upper leaf surface. Its pink and purple flower petals droop downward. This plant’s large, striking blossoms are stunning when they bloom. It differs from Echinacea pallida (pale purple coneflower) by its broader leaves, bushier growth form, and later blooming time.

Echinacea pallida are also known as pale purple coneflower or pallid coneflower. Sometimes their flowers are challenging to distinguish apart from Echinacea purpurea. The pale purple coneflower leaves are long and narrow, hairy, lighter green, and frequently stay near the root.

Which Type Of Echinacea Is Best Used For Tea?

All types of Echinacea are used for tea. Various plant parts contain phenolics that are beneficial to human health. Purple coneflower products differ in their composition due to uneven distributions of phenolic compounds and solubilities in different solvents. For example, Echinacea water extracts or infusions are prepared from purple coneflower leaves. These parts of the plant possess the highest concentrations of caftaric acid and other phenolic compounds, according to a 2018 study led by Dr. Senica et al. as stated in the Journal of Medicine Food.

How Can You Tell The Difference Between Echinacea Purpurea And Angustifolia?

Echinacea purpurea is the more commonly cultivated herb and tends to grow better in more easterly regions than Echinacea angustifolia (native to the North American prairies). In appearance, Echinacea angustifolia is known as the narrow-leaved variety because it has thinner leaves and a fleshy taproot. In contrast, Echinacea purpurea has a fibrous root and oval, broadly lance-shaped leaves.

What Are The Different Varieties Of Echinacea?

The horticultural industry has created countless hybrids of this plant. Echinacea flowers are purple, pale purple, or yellow in their native form, but hybridized varieties can be red, orange, pink, green, or multi-colored. Listed below are the different types of Echinacea that are hybrids of two other species of the coneflower.

1. Avalanche (Echinacea Purpurea ‘avalanche’)

Echinacea ‘avalanche’ is an upright, compact hybrid coneflower boasting white rays and yellow-green center cones. It’s a new breed cultivated from cross-pollination in Bovenkarspel, The Netherlands, in July 2003. It thrives in full sun or dappled shade and may well replace the less hardy Shasta daisy in your flower garden. Echinacea purpurea ‘avalanche’ is a long-blooming flower used in patio pots, border fringes, and raised beds. The flowers blossom between June and September, with isolated sporadic bloom until frost. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 3 to 8.

2. Cheyenne Spirit (Echinacea ‘Cheyenne Spirit’)

A striking Echinacea hybrid, ‘Cheyenne Spirit,’ was presented by Kieft-Pro Seeds in 2012. This Fleuroselect Gold Medal winner yields cheerful blooms that consist of a mixture of rich shades of yellow, cream, pink, tomato-red, orange, yellow, or purple ray flowers with brown disk centers. You may expect late-summer blooms if you start your seeds indoors in the winter. This plant does not require a lot of water and is utilized in perennial borders, large planters, butterfly gardens, and as cut flowers. ‘Cheyenne Spirit’ is a horticultural hybrid that blooms between July and August. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

3. Daydream (Echinacea ‘daydream’)

The Echinacea ‘daydream’ hybrid combines two coneflower varieties, providing bigger blooms on highly branching and compact plants. The scented soft-yellow drooping petals wrap around the brown central cone. This hybridized fragrant plant founded by Harini Korlipara blooms sooner than other Echinacea varieties, beginning as early as May and continuing to bloom for nearly five months. It is suitable for beds, borders, meadows, and wildflower gardens. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

4. Double Scoop Cranberry (Echinacea X Purpurea ‘Balscanery’)

The Echinacea ‘Double Scoop’ series features a lush, double-petaled flower. Coneflowers come in various varieties, including orangeberry, bubblegum, and raspberry. The plant’s flowers are bright crimson to cranberry in color and emerge on sturdy stems. The outer layers of the flower have a fanned-out layer of longer petals that are somewhat downturned, and the inner layers feature a mop of petals surrounded by more petals. In July, the flowers appear and last through September. This herbaceous perennial hybrid is suitable for sunny borders, mixed containers, and beautiful, fresh cuts. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 7.

5. Firebird (Echinacea ‘Firebird’)

The glowing blooms of Echinacea ‘Firebird’ were developed in Oregon as part of the Birds series in 2009. One of the most pleasing aspects of this butterfly magnet is the non-fading color of its brilliant flowers. It has dense, upright, well-branched, red shuttlecock flowers and large dark cones. The ‘Firebird’ blooms from mid-summer through fall. This hybrid is used in mass plantings, mixed beds, in the middle of borders, and as a cut flower. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

6. Flame Thrower (Echinacea ‘flame Thrower’)

‘Flame Thrower’ Echinacea is a bright, two-toned orange and yellow coneflower of the Prairie Pillar™Series. Its 2009 introduction, in which substantial rusted brown cones are featured, is a dream for garden designers. Its well-branched plants ignite the garden with color all season and are an excellent choice for the middle of a border or along a fence line. The germination and growth of this hybrid are possible year-round in temperate, frost-free climates. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 3 to 8.

7. Greenline (Echinacea Purpurea ‘greenline’)

Echinacea purpurea ‘greenline’ features a compact, clump-forming, high-domed, double coneflower with white overtones. The flower features round downward sloping ray florets white to pale lime in hue with a darker emerald green center. ‘Greenline’ is an attractive choice for creating a sunny border, and these chartreuse gems sparkle when planted with magenta or hot pink blooms. This hybrid is a relatively early bloomer, with flowers appearing from June through August. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 3 to 8.

 

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8. Hot Papaya (Echinacea ‘hot Papaya’)

The ‘hot Papaya’ hybrid was developed by Dutch hybridizer Arie Blom of AB Cultivars. This Echinacea variety is part of the double pom-pom Echinaceas in the CONE-FECTIONS™ series and has become one of the most coveted Echinaceas in recent years. It is the first hybrid double Echinacea with a rich orange color. The vivid hues blossom profusely for a long-lasting season from mid to late summer. Its newly opened flowers begin with a brilliant gold hue, then transition to tropical, flame orange, and strongly exhibit the traits of Echinacea purpurea in foliage. The plant forms a robust, sturdy clump with rich, dark-green foliage and thick stems. It is a good choice for the middle of a flower border and cut flowers with a vase life of nearly two weeks. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

9. Leilani (Echinacea ‘leilani’)

Echinacea ‘leilani’ is a part of the Prairie Pillar™ series developed by Terra Nova Nurseries. This Echinacea hybrid crosses Echinacea paradoxa and Echinacea purpurea ‘Ruby Giant’ with large flowers, mango-colored rays, and a dark, orange disc. Despite its height of almost 4 feet, it remains upright through the season. ‘Leilani’ coneflowers are notable for their sturdy stems that withstand the searing summer heat and make excellent cut flowers. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

10. PowWow Wild Berry (Echinacea Purpurea ‘pas702917’)

‘PowWow Wild Berry’ is a compact hybrid from PanAm Seed Co. with rosy pink blooms petals that are short and wide and surround a central orange cone. ‘PowWow Wild Berry’ won the All-America Selection award in 2010 and blooms in the middle of summer, continuing to late fall without requiring deadheading. This award-winner cultivar prefers a slightly cooler climate than most coneflowers and grows effectively planted in a border, as part of a rock garden, or in pots. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 3 to 8.

11. Secret Passion (Echinacea ‘secret Passion’)

Echinacea ‘secret Passion’ joins eight other ‘secret’ Echinaceas, including ‘S. Glow,’ ‘S. Desire,’ and ‘S. Romance,’ all featuring fully double and lushly petaled blossoms. The double cones have bright, flamingo pink ray flowers, and the plant has a compact, well-branched habit. The flowers are fragrant and long-lasting, making them perfect for your vase. ‘Secret Passion’ has a longer-lasting bloom period and flowers all summer and fall. It is an excellent plant to use along borders and in mixed beds and vases. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

12. Tomato Soup (Echinacea ‘tomato Soup’)

‘Tomato Soup’ crosses Echinacea paradoxa (original pollen parent) and Echinacea purpurea ‘Ruby Giant’ (original seed parent). This hybrid coneflower has brilliant, tomato-red flowers that fade to pink as they mature. This daisy-like flower has lightly drooping large petals and long-lasting blooms. Like its parent plants, it is tolerant of harsh conditions such as drought, dry soil, heat, and poor soil. ‘Tomato Soup’ coneflowers bloom from June through August with sporadic blooms until frost. The plant is well suited for borders, mixed beds, and cut flower arrangements. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 3 to 8. 

13. Intense Orange (Echinacea Kismet® ‘intense Orange’)

Echinacea ‘intense Orange’ was introduced in 2017 as part of the Kismet Series, with distinctive large flowers in multi-colored shades from deep orange to pumpkin tones. The dark green leaves go well with the flowers, which continue to blossom from summer through winter. The Kismet Series is well-known for its upright growth and long bloom duration that lasts for weeks. Aside from their increased winter survival, these flowers are excellent for cutting. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

14. Big Sky Sunrise (Echinacea ‘sunrise’ )

‘Sunrise’ is reportedly the result of the 2002 cross-pollination of Echinacea purpurea ‘White Swan’ (seed parent) with an unnamed selection of Echinacea purpurea x Echinacea paradoxa (pollen parent). Richard Saul, the owner of Itsaul Nurseries in Atlanta, Georgia, created this hybrid as a part of the Big Sky series. It is known for its extensive, fragrant coneflowers with citron-yellow rays that horizontally extend rather than droop. Its green-maturing-to-orange center cones bloom from late spring to later summer. This upright and columnar hybrid is typically used in a clump on sturdy stems in gardens, flower borders and beds, and cut flowers. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9. 

15. Green Envy (Echinacea Purpurea ‘green Envy’)

‘Green Envy’ is one of the more unusual coneflower hybrids. The eye-catching greenish-white flowers have attractive rounded petals with pink tones near the plant’s inky-green cone. The flowers change from deep green to dark purple as they develop, are long-lasting, and sit on sturdy stems above the leaves. From July to September, this variety has a slightly shorter bloom season than other ​coneflowers. It is a popular choice for warm climates and a must-have for summer garden borders and cut flowers. ‘Green Envy’ adds a wilderness look to your garden. This coneflower species is native to the central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

16. Razzmatazz

Razzmatazz is a double-flowered version of the famous purple coneflower bred by Marco Van Noort from Holland. Instead of the traditional central cone, each flower has a dome covered with tiny rose-pink petals surrounded by a skirt of longer petals. This hybrid is noted for its upright plant habit and blooms from June through August. It is excellent for cutting and can be planted in a large tub, mixed container, or combined beautifully with smaller daisy-flowered perennials. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 3 to 9.

17. Double Decker (Echinacea Purpurea ‘doubledecker’)

‘Double Decker’ was developed from an unusual mutation by Eugen Schleipfer of Germany. It bears a unique double-layer bloom of pink daisy-like flowers with a prominent brown central cone. The plant’s blossoms appear similar to traditional pink coneflowers in the first year. However, the second layer of shorter petals begins in the second growing season. This coneflower hybrid has a long bloom period from late spring to late summer and thrives in a slightly cooler climate. It is an excellent plant for borders, mixed beds, and cut flowers.

This coneflower species is native to the central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 3 to 8.

18. Kim’s Knee High (Echinacea Purpurea ‘Kim”s Knee High’)

Echinacea purpurea ‘Kim’s Knee High’ is a compact or dwarf version of the coneflower species plant named after Kim Hawks. Pink blooms with reflected rays and a central orange cone are typical of ‘Kim’s Knee High.’ It is the smallest coneflower variety and is cited for its long summer bloom, from June through August. It’s an excellent option for tiny gardens or wherever you need smaller plants. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 3 to 8.

19. Bravado (Echinacea Purpurea ‘bravado’)

A golden-brown, cone-shaped center and large, rose-red petals atop reddish-green stems distinguish Echinacea Purpurea ‘bravado.’ It is a robust plant with wide blooms that range in color from light pink to magenta rose. Compared to its native counterparts, ‘bravado’s’ petals stand straight versus curving down. It has a typical summer-long bloom period, from June through August. This hybrid is ideal for low-maintenance gardens, perennials, mixed borders, and cut flowers. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 3 to 9.

20. Fragrant Angel (Echinacea Purpurea ‘fragrant Angel’)

‘Fragrant Angel’ is a type of Echinacea purpurea ‘Ruby Giant.’ These blooms have a pleasant, powerful fragrance true to the cultivar name. It is titled for its distinctive, white, daisy-like flowers and yellowish-orange center cones. ‘Fragrant Angel’ is a member of the Prairie Pillar Series from Terra Nova Nurseries in Oregon. This tall plant has petals that stand out horizontally rather than curving downward and blooms throughout the summer. This beautiful hybrid is best used in mass plantings, mixed beds, central borders, and flower cuts. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 3 to 9.

21. Big Sky Harvest Moon (Echinacea Big Sky ‘Harvest Moon’)

A new plant in the Big Sky Series from Richard Saul of Atlanta, Georgia, is Echinacea ‘Harvest Moon.’ It resulted from the 2003 cross-pollination of Echinacea purpurea and Echinacea paradoxa. It has a rose-like fragrance and rich golden flowers surrounding a golden-orange cone. Like others in this series, Harvest Moon has a high tolerance for heat and humidity. This variety has a bushy habit and blooms throughout summer. The flowers are excellent for cutting. The ‘Harvest Moon’ variety is preferred for various landscaping purposes, including mass planting, border edging, general garden usage, planters, and fresh cuts. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

 

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22. Mango Meadowbrite ( Echinacea ‘Mango Meadowbrite™’)

Another herb of the Big Sky Series produced by crossing Echinacea purpurea and Echinacea paradoxa is ‘Mango Meadowbrite.’ This variety has deep, golden-yellow petals, and, like others in this series, ‘Mango Meadowbrite’ has a good tolerance for heat and humidity and blooms throughout summer. Its large neon mango-yellow petals surround a deep golden-orange cone. Flowers sit on branching stems upon a shallow mound of dark green leaves. Its flowers have a lovely honeysuckle scent that lasts throughout the summer and into the fall, making them ideal for cutting. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

23. Orange Meadowbrite (Echinacea ‘Orange Meadowbrite’)

The ‘Orange Meadowbrite’ Echinacea was developed at the Chicago Botanical Garden in 2004 as a cross between Echinacea purpurea ‘Alba’ and Echinacea paradoxa. Its popularity stems from its colorful coppery-orange petals surrounding a dark brown central cone. The plant’s flowers have an orange-spiced tea fragrance and semi-glossy, dark green leaves. ‘Orange Meadowbrite’ may be utilized in perennial borders, extensive planters, butterfly gardens, and flower cuts. ‘Orange Meadow’ blooms from June to August. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

24. Pixie Meadowbrite (Echinacea ‘Meadowbrite’)

‘Pixie Meadowbrite’ is an excellent dwarf variety. It produces dense purple flowers in traditional shapes, which is unusual for most coneflower varieties. It is a selection from a controlled cross of Echinacea [tennesseensis x purpurea] x [angustifolia x tennesseensis] bred by Dr. Jim Ault of the Chicago Botanic Garden. The plants are compact and knee-high with narrow, green leaves that produce a profusion of pink flowers in midsummer. Its orange cone grows atop the thin leaves. The plant is ideal for small flower borders, decorative containers, or courtyard gardens. ‘Pixie Meadowbrite’s’ coneflowers are praised for their cheerful, brightly colored petals, which are a mainstay in today’s garden. This coneflower species is native to central and southeastern U.S. and grows in USDA Growing Zones 4 to 9.

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  12. Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench | Plants of the World Online | Kew Science. (2022). Retrieved 15 February 2022, from https://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:1174497-2#source-KSP

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